More states are betting on sports gambling. But for most, it's a losing wager.

When the Patriots won the Super Bowl again — and covered the spread, too — all of New England was delirious, with the possible exception of Rhode Island's tax collectors.

The state's sportsbooks lost $2.35 million because, come on, really, who's going to bet against Tom Brady in New England? That, in turn, cut into Rhode Island's tax revenue.

For a variety of reasons, not just the Patriots' star quarterback, most of the states that moved quickly to legalize sports betting after the Supreme Court cleared the way are still waiting for the expected payoff.

Tax revenue has fallen far short of projections in four of the six states where gambling on sporting events started last year, according to an Associated Press analysis.

Rhode Island, the only place in New England with legal sports betting, had expected to generate more than $1 million a month for its state budget through its 51% tax on sportsbook proceeds. The actual revenue? About $50,000 a month from the late-November launch through February, which included the Super Bowl.

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