There Is a Connection between Problem Gambling and Other Addictions, NIMHANS Researchers Say

A recent study held by researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) has found that addictive gambling, as well as other behavioural addictions, has been a condition relating to the common health of urban India’s population.

The findings of the survey have been published in the Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry’s recent issue. A total of 3,250 individuals took part in the research, with 1.2% of them facing excessive gambling along with an addiction to television, mobile phones or even eating.

The head of the Service for Healthy Use of Technology (SHUT) clinic at the Institute, Manoj Kumar Sharma, who is also the lead author of the above-mentioned study, has revealed that unfortunately, there is lack of solid evidence that there is a relationship between compulsive gambling and other forms of addiction. As he explained, the research is the first of its kind for a community-based setting from India.

Dr. Sharma further noted that researchers found 1.2% prevalence of probable gambling addiction in the 18-50 age group. An interesting fact is that no women in the sample reported problem gambling.

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ONE YEAR IN, WHO ARE THE BIG WINNERS FROM LEGAL US SPORTS BETTING?

The winners from legal US sports betting are not only the lucky punters who hit six-figure wins from small bets on bizarre accumulators. Since the Supreme Court overturned PASPA one year ago in May 2018, sports betting has become a fast-growing industry.

It includes many players, large and small, all hoping to cash in on the trend. However, not all can win. Like the dot-com frenzy of the 1990s, many of the major players went bust.

But who will win in the race to establish sports betting across the US and who will lose?

From a cast that includes casinos, sports leagues, broadcasters, tech companies, payment processors, advertising companies, state lotteries and affiliates, we choose three big winners: The citizens of gaming states, the states themselves and the sports betting operators.

(The losers we leave to a second article.)

Continue reading here.

Ohio’s sports gambling plans may be delayed

Ohio is close to legalizing sports gambling, but close doesn’t quite cut it. Whether a bill is two steps, or five, away from being signed into law, it still isn’t law. Disputes can happen at any turn, forcing any subject to a grinding halt. This is essentially where Ohio is now, with lawmakers unable to reach a consensus on several points. Sports gambling most likely won’t come to Ohio this year.

The General Assembly is considering two bills – one each from the House and the Senate. House Bill 194 (HB 194) and Senate Bill 111 (SB 111) each have their merits and are similar in a lot of ways, but the two chambers differ on a number of points in the legislation, including who will regulate the sports gambling industry.

The House bill has the Ohio Lottery Commission would regulate an industry that could contain as many as 1,000 sportsbooks across the state. The Senate bill, on the other hand, wants the activity to be controlled by the Ohio Casino Control Commission (OCCC). The Senate argues that the commission has the experience and expertise to control the activity and would want sports wagers to be available only at the 11 casinos and racinos licensed in the state.

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Ohio Sports Betting Efforts Have Completely Stalled Out

  • There has been no movement with OH HB 194 and OH SB 111 since introduction.

  • The Ohio legislative session does not end until December 31.

Two Different Ideas For Sports Betting

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio sports betting bills introduced in the last two months have not moved since introduction.

There are two sports betting bills that are being considered by Ohio’s Congress. OH SB 111 was first introduced in March. The bill would allow the Ohio Casino Control Commission (OCCC) to regulate sports betting. This would allow for 11 different sportsbooks to open up in Ohio. OH SB 111 would also allow for the introduction of mobile sports wagering.

Read more details here.

Former Bedford employee indicted for embezzling money to pay gambling debts

A former city of Bedford employee has been indicted for allegedly embezzling thousands of dollars while collecting residential water supply fees.

Lynda Yarish has been charged with two counts of theft in office, tampering with records and falsification, according to Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas records.

Between Jan. 1, 2015 and Nov. 30, 2016, Yarish embezzled more than $10,000 while collecting fees for water shut-offs, permits and vital statistics, the indictment states.

Read more of the article here.

Marion owner of Frosty Mug bar faces gambling charges

A Marion bar owner faces criminal charges for alleged gambling in his bar.

James R. Frank II, 47, the owner of the Frosty Mug on South Prospect Street, was indicted last month on one count of gambling and two counts of operating a gambling house, all fifth-degree felonies, in Marion County Common Pleas Court.

The charges were leveled after agents with the Ohio Investigative Unit said they received cash payouts as a prize after playing video slot machines at the Frosty Mug in February and March, said Eric Wolf, enforcement commander with the Ohio Investigative Unit, which investigates possible illegal activity in bars, restaurants and other places with liquor permits.

Wolf said that bars are not allowed to pay out cash, as opposed to tickets or tokens, as a prize from gaming machines.

Two machines were seized as a result of the investigation, the commander told the Star.

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The risky use of video game ‘loot boxes’ is associated with problematic gambling behaviors

Engagement with “loot boxes” — randomly generated prizes of undisclosed value that can be attained or purchased within a game — is correlated with gambling beliefs and problematic gambling behavior in adult gamers, according to a study published in Addictive Behaviors.

“Our focus upon loot boxes stems from a broader interest in the ‘gamblification’ of video games, or when video games acquire traits similar to gambling,” said study author Gabriel Brooks, a PhD student at the Centre for Gambling Research at the University of British Columbia.

Loot boxes began appearing in video games in the mid-2000s and have grown in popularity since. In some cases, players earn them as rewards for game play, but players are often encouraged to buy them using real or virtual currency.

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Sportsbook ads are a losing proposition for compulsive gamblers

The tagline makes the solution sound so simple: “Gamble responsibly.”

For those who struggle with compulsive gambling, it’s anything but simple. Instead, the footnote caps a powerful temptation as ads for sports betting emerge in states that have recently legalized an activity once banned in most of the United States.

Sharon, a 39-year-old homemaker, decided with her husband to move from New Jersey to New York specifically to get away from legalized sports betting, but still sees ads frequently that remind her of the tens of thousands of dollars in debt she racked up on a wagering app.

Charlie, an information technology professional from suburban Philadelphia, says the advertisements and easy access make wagering “tempting as hell,” even as his losses mounted to $400,000 as he bet online while traveling on service calls.

They've complicated addiction recovery for Gary, a real estate agent from New Jersey who attends support group meetings and has lost nearly $2 million over a lifetime of gambling.

Continue reading the article here.

Bet responsibly? A struggle for some as sportsbook ads widen

The tagline makes the solution sound so simple: “Gamble responsibly.”

It’s anything but for those who struggle with compulsive gambling. Instead, the footnote caps a powerful new temptation as ads for sports betting emerge in states that have recently legalized an activity once banned in most of the United States.

Sharon, a 39-year-old homemaker, decided with her husband to move from New Jersey to New York specifically to get away from legalized sports betting, but still sees ads frequently that remind her of the tens of thousands of dollars in debt she racked up on a wagering app.

Charlie, an information technology professional from suburban Philadelphia, says the advertisements and easy access makes wagering “tempting as hell,” even as his losses mounted to $400,000 as he bet online while traveling on service calls.

They’ve complicated addiction recovery for Gary, a real estate agent from New Jersey who attends support group meetings and has lost nearly $2 million over a lifetime of gambling.

“It seems like every fourth commercial, there’s one telling you how easy it is to bet on sports and make money,” said Gary, who like other gamblers spoke to The Associated Press on condition that his full name not be used because of stigmas some people associate with unhealthy gambling.

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Apple Issue Regarding Online Gambling Continues to Be a Problem

When it comes to online gambling, the majority of players want to be able to access their gaming options via a mobile device. With mobile gaming, players can easily play casino or poker games, as well as enjoy sports betting or the lottery where available, from any location. Mobile has quickly taken over as a must-offer for states in the US who want to be successful with online gaming. However, a recent change to the App Store terms of service of Apple have caused an issue for the legal online gambling landscape of the US.

Updated Rules

On Monday, Apple released their updated rules that include new protocols that must be followed. These new protocols have an impact on the online gambling industry in the United States. According to the changes, HTML5 games that are distributed in applications cannot provide real money gaming access, as well as lotteries, charitable donations or support digital commerce.

This type of function is only allowed for code that is embedded in binary and can be reviewed by the Apple company. New apps must follow this protocol and existing apps have to start following the new guideline by the 3rd of September.

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Gambling at Ohio’s casinos and racinos jumps 10% in May

Ohio’s casinos and racinos had a robust month in May, with gambling revenue after paying out winnings up 10.4 percent from May a year ago, reports released Friday’s by the state’s lottery and casino control commissions showed.

Locally, revenue jumped 9.3% at the MGM Northfield Park, 15% at JACK Cleveland Casino and 17.3% at JACK Thistledown Racino.

Statewide at Ohio’s 11 casinos and racinos, revenue totaled $169.4 million, up from $153.5 million in May 2018. About a third of this money goes to the state in taxes and fees.

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As Ohio gambling options expand, so will the number who fall into problem gambling: Letter to the Editor

The Plain Dealer recently published an article on the indictment of a former Bedford employee who allegedly embezzled money to pay for her gambling debts (“Former city employee accused of embezzlement, officials say,” May 27). Problem gambling is on the rise here in Ohio. As gambling options expand, so will the number of people who fall into problem gambling. Currently, the Ohio Lottery is working toward making playing the lottery games available on your phone. Bills have been introduced in the Ohio House and Senate to allow sports wagering in Ohio. It’s likely mobile wagering will be part of whatever legislation is passed and enacted.

Problem gambling should not be ignored. It’s a mental health issue. Nobody sets out to develop a gambling disorder, just as no one sets outs to develop any addictive behavior. Gambling disorder also carries a high risk for suicide. Help is available. If you or someone you know needs help with gambling issues, please make the call. Referral specialists are available 24 hours a day to assist you in finding local resources and other options. The Ohio Problem Gambling Helpline is at 1-800-589-9966.

Jess Stewart,

Streetsboro

See the Cleveland.com article.

Pete Rose opens up: Gambling nowadays, crazy Ted Williams tale and ‘winning life’

Post columnist Steve Serby gets inside the head of baseball’s Hit King Pete Rose — to discuss his gambling, Hall of Fame ban, the state of today’s game and his legacy.

Q: With more states, eight and counting, legalizing sports gambling and MLB making MGM Resorts International its “official gaming partner,” and you banned from the Hall of Fame for gambling, how do you feel about that partnership?
A: Listen, I’m not opposed to baseball doing anything to create more revenue for ’em. That’s their business. I thought it was kind of interesting that, as a former manager of a baseball team, that 15 minutes before every game I have to email my lineup to baseball. Then they email it to the MGM, the casinos. I think that’s kind of interesting if you talk about being in bed with somebody — they’re really in bed with them.

For the rest of the questions and answers click here.

Ohio lawmakers differ on sports betting legislation

Ohio lawmakers are debating over two competing versions of a sports betting plan.

The Senate version calls for the Ohio Casino Control Commission (OCCC) to regulate, while the House bill wants the Ohio Lottery to be the regulator.

Under the House plan, 10% of the profits would come back to the state while the Senate plan would have 6.75%. Two percent would be donated back to addiction treatment services.

Estimated revenue could be between $30 and $60 million a year.

Eleven other states have already passed sports betting laws. Ohio would be the 12th state, but when that will happen is anyone's guess.

Not only do lawmakers differ on who should be in charge of overseeing the program, but there is also a much larger debate on what businesses should be allowed to have sports betting.

See the rest of the article here.

DeWine favors giving sports betting to Casino Control Commission

Gov. Mike DeWine has let legislative leaders know that he favors having the Ohio Casino Control Commission put in charge of regulating sports betting, rather than the Ohio Lottery Commission.

But the high-stakes, much-lobbied debate is far from over.

The issue of which commission should regulate Ohio’s newest gambling expansion has been a key part of the debate as state officials decide how to proceed in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last year legalizing sports betting nationwide.

The two chambers have thus far differed, with House Bill 194 putting sports betting under control of the Lottery Commission and Senate Bill 111, which has not yet had a hearing, giving it to the Casino Control Commission.

The governor met with representatives of both commissions, and Dan Tierney, spokesman for DeWine, confirmed that the governor this week informed the House speaker, Senate president and sponsor of the House bill, Rep. Dave Greenspan, R-Westlake, of his preference.

Continue reading here.

If sports betting is legalized in Ohio, the state Casino Control Commission should police it: editorial

The General Assembly is likely to legalize sports betting in Ohio -- not because it’s something Ohio really needs or lawmakers want.

Rather, as was true with medical marijuana, it’s something too many Ohioans can be convinced they should have via a costly referendum campaign that won’t do what’s needed to safeguard the state’s interests.

Without appropriate safeguards, for instance, sports wagering is more likely to corrupt athletics -- and cheat Ohioans. And with neighboring states such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia already having legalized sports betting, one inevitable pro-sports-betting argument at the Statehouse will be that Ohio will lose revenue to its neighbors unless it does the same.

Either way, far better that legislators write a plan after careful analysis and hearings, than to have sports betting foisted on Ohioans via a special-interest ballot issue.

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Money laundering penalties made tougher in Ohio sports betting bill

A bill that would legalize sports betting in Ohio was heavily changed Thursday to prevent people from using laundered money in the games.

House Bill 194 also has changes to ensure Ohio conforms with the federal Wire Act, which the U.S. Department of Justice has recently determined it can use to go after online gambling.

H.B. 194 is one of two measures wending through the Ohio General Assembly that would legalize sports betting, which the U.S. Supreme Court permitted in states in a decision about a year ago. The other measure is Senate Bill 111, which is different because regulation would be under the Ohio Casino Control Commission, rather than the Ohio Lottery Commission in HB 194.

HB 194 now specifies it would be a fifth-degree felony on the first offense and a fourth-degree felony on subsequent offenses to try to interfere with a sports betting facility’s submission of reports under the Bank Secrecy Act of 1970, the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and state banking laws. Rep. Dave Greenspan, a Westlake Republican who is a bill sponsor, said that the laws help the government trace laundered money and prevent it from getting into the gambling industry.

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Sports Gambling In Ohio Expected To Include Online Gaming

There are two bipartisan bills that will decide how sports gaming would be overseen by the state. But there’s also a debate over where it will happen – in gambling facilities, at other venues, or even in people’s homes and pockets.

It’s been just over a year since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled states can legalize sports gambling.  But it was happening before that and since then.

“Some estimates put the illegal US sports wagering market at upward of $100 billion annually,” said Ayesha Molino, senior vice president of federal government affairs with MGM Resorts International, which owns the Cleveland area racino now called MGM Northfield.

Molino said MGM handles a billion dollars in sports wagers each year across the country.  And Molino told members of the House Finance Committee that it’s time for Ohio to join the seven states that have legalized it. 

Read the rest of the article here.

Where Will Sports Gambling In Ohio Take Place?

Two bi-partisan bills regulating how the state oversees sports gambling are in the legislature. 

But there's a debate over where it will happen - in gambling facilities, at other venues, or in people's homes and pockets. Ohio Public Radio's Karen Kasler reports.

It’s been just over a year since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled states can legalize sports gambling. But it was happening before that and since then.

“Some estimates put the illegal US sports wagering market at upward of $100 billion annually,” said Ayesha Molino, senior vice president of federal government affairs with MGM Resorts International, which owns the Cleveland area racino now called MGM Northfield.

Read more here.

Problem gamblers at 15 times higher risk of suicide, study finds

Swedish research, if applied to UK, suggests 550 suicides a year are linked to gambling

People with a gambling problem are 15 times more likely to take their own life, according to the largest study of its kind, prompting calls for swifter action by the government to tackle betting addiction.

Academics at Lund University, Sweden, monitored more than 2,000 people with gambling disorders, finding a significantly elevated risk of suicide among participants compared with the general population over an 11-year period.

The study found that suicide rates increased 19-fold among men between the ages of 20 and 49 if they had a gambling problem and by 15 times among men and women of all ages.

The authors of the research said that while the causes of suicide were complex and likely to involve more than one factor, their work indicated gambling disorders were associated with far higher than average rates of suicide.

Continue reading here.